Help W/ Inno, Please.

Discussion in 'XM Radios' started by gtee3, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. gtee3

    gtee3 New Member

    Hello, I am new to this forum.

    I have been a long time XM client.
    I use an INNO unit to listen to XM through the stereo.
    I have tried to use the INNO in a vehicle that has a factory CD/radio, and get decent local reception.
    two questions:
    -is there a resource to find the best FM frequency to route the INNO/XM signal through the car stereo? ie. the least used FM frequency for my travels out of my local area.
    -second, is there a user manual/resource for the INNO? I only received a basic brochure w/ the INNO purchase. I would like to learn more of the INNO features and MP3 capabilities.

    Thanks in advance for your help!
    Phil
  2. IdRatherBeSkiing

    IdRatherBeSkiing This space for rent

  3. gtee3

    gtee3 New Member

    Appreciate the help!
    go Blue Jays!
    Phil
    HecticArt and IdRatherBeSkiing like this.
  4. HecticArt

    HecticArt Administrator

    Glad you found us Phil. Welcome!


    Keep us posted on your progress.
    If you need more help, let us know.
  5. gtee3

    gtee3 New Member

    Thanks guys for your prompt action and info!!
    If anyone knows of an info source to find the least used FM frequencies in the US...this would help me program my car system to get the best XM reception.
    thanks,
    Phil
  6. HecticArt

    HecticArt Administrator

    I used to transmit for my Stiletto. It wasn't too hard to find a station or two that worked while I was in town, but as soon as I took to the highway, it was always a struggle to find decent empty bandwidth to use. I eventually got sick of it and got a direct connect adapter to save the hassle. Station drift is like fingers on a chalkboard to me. If you can get behind your dash, it's worth hooking one up in my opinion.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do, and keep hitting us up for suggestions. Everyone's experiences are a bit different.
  7. gtee3

    gtee3 New Member

    I appreciate your suggestion.
    I googled the direct connect adapter, and I see that an Aux or Cassette input are required?
    Unfortunately, my Cayenne only has am/fm & cd...
    And an aftermarket install is $$$$ due to the fiber optic wiring of Bose system.
    Am I missing something?
    I agree with your statement that in-town is good, but I am going to do a cross-country to the West this winter.
    thx,
    Phil
  8. HecticArt

    HecticArt Administrator

    There's the direct adapter that connects through your fm antenna input.
    (I forget the exact name of it.)
    Not very expensive. Check the TSS Radio website. They do sponsor our site, but are really good, and won't try to sell you stuff you don't need.
    JHDK likes this.
  9. geosync

    geosync Well-Known Member

    You have a Cayenne and no good satellite reception? Where do you live?
  10. gtee3

    gtee3 New Member

    geosync,
    my reception in Milw, Wi is OK...
    I am preparing for a trip to Az, and would like one or two solid FM reception stations as go to.
    thanks,
    Phil
  11. HecticArt

    HecticArt Administrator

    My luck with driving across states using the fm transmitter hasn't been great. I'd end up switching stations every 45 minutes to an hour. It drove me nuts.
  12. geosync

    geosync Well-Known Member

    You are screwed getting any fm transmitter help traveling cross country. Best luck is leaving the radio where the windshield meets the dash and it will work great. 4 hours of life reception if you're lucky. Bring a charger. You have an audio in right?
  13. HecticArt

    HecticArt Administrator

    He didn't have an audio in or old school cassette. That was what mad me think the direct antenna adapter was his best route for a clear, hassle free connection.

    Sent from Tapatalk
  14. geosync

    geosync Well-Known Member

    The XM Direct2 would work sure but he has to install it. Just eat the dough and have it installed professionally.
    HecticArt likes this.

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