The Dumb Dodo Thread

scotchandcigar

All I wanted was some steak
Feb 13, 2009
22,634
18,011
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Vacationland
I'm sorry, but I call bullshit on the facts in this article, and the implication that one must stand in the middle of a room for the entirety of a thunderstorm. I'd like to know the statistics behind people being "maimed" by shower-water during a thunderstorm, or by standing "near a door". And while it's possible for electronics to be damaged by a lightning strike - although it's fairly uncommon, and there are ways to prevent it - I'm wondering how the voltage or current surge would reach a person at the keyboard of a computer. Again, where's the evidence?

Don’t shower during a thunderstorm. Here’s why​

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Lightning can kill or maim in ways you would least expect it. That includes when you are taking a shower, washing in the tub or even washing dishes. Since lightning can travel through plumbing, “it is best to avoid all water during a thunderstorm. Do not shower, bathe, wash dishes, or wash your hands,” the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted. “The risk of lightning traveling through plumbing might be less with plastic pipes than with metal pipes,” the CDC added. “However, it is best to avoid any contact with plumbing and running water during a lightning storm to reduce your risk of being struck.”

That’s not the only danger when you’re inside. Stay off porches and balconies, don’t go near windows and doors, and do “NOT lie down on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls,” the agency said. Also, do “NOT use anything connected to an electrical outlet, such as computers or other electronic equipment,” the CDC said. “Stay off corded phones. Cell phones and cordless phones are safe … if they are not connected to an outlet through a charger.”
 

HecticArt

Administrator
Oct 19, 2008
49,114
17,070
168
Toledo, Ohio
I'm sorry, but I call bullshit on the facts in this article, and the implication that one must stand in the middle of a room for the entirety of a thunderstorm. I'd like to know the statistics behind people being "maimed" by shower-water during a thunderstorm, or by standing "near a door". And while it's possible for electronics to be damaged by a lightning strike - although it's fairly uncommon, and there are ways to prevent it - I'm wondering how the voltage or current surge would reach a person at the keyboard of a computer. Again, where's the evidence?

Don’t shower during a thunderstorm. Here’s why​

View attachment 8934

Lightning can kill or maim in ways you would least expect it. That includes when you are taking a shower, washing in the tub or even washing dishes. Since lightning can travel through plumbing, “it is best to avoid all water during a thunderstorm. Do not shower, bathe, wash dishes, or wash your hands,” the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted. “The risk of lightning traveling through plumbing might be less with plastic pipes than with metal pipes,” the CDC added. “However, it is best to avoid any contact with plumbing and running water during a lightning storm to reduce your risk of being struck.”

That’s not the only danger when you’re inside. Stay off porches and balconies, don’t go near windows and doors, and do “NOT lie down on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls,” the agency said. Also, do “NOT use anything connected to an electrical outlet, such as computers or other electronic equipment,” the CDC said. “Stay off corded phones. Cell phones and cordless phones are safe … if they are not connected to an outlet through a charger.”
I think that there is truth to it. I think that the odds of physical danger are much lower than standing under a tree or holding a golf club in the air during a thunder storm, but I think it CAN happen.

I know of several business and people that have lost electronics because they weren't properly protected from lightning.
I should ask one of my electrical engineers when there is a little time for banter.
 
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